In Cuxhaven

The lock in Brunsbüttel out to the Elbe went well, and we aim for Cuxhaven at the southern mouth of the river, only 2-3 hours away. It was a rainy and gray journey. We can sail for about two hours, then the wind is too much ahead for Sally and the engine has to work the last bit.

It is not difficult to understand that containers are dropped, as the 200 Jonas wrote about on FB, when you see these ships.

Now we also have currents and tides to think about, something completely new for us. We have taken courses, and if we were to produce old textbooks, I think we would probably be able to calculate the tide using the tables. But it’s so amazing nowadays that everything is in our digital charts, without advanced calculations. Hope the computers work !!

Getting in or out of a river mouth with currents and waves against each other can be an adventure if it is windy. Something that is not recommended. The waves get shorter and higher when they meet the current, and current and waves can throw the boat in all directions. So it is important to check the wind and current:)

Cuxhaven has a large and good harbor, and we get a place along a jetty. As we think is most convenient to be docked.

On the pier above us, there is a man in this cure and shouts out information in loudspeakers about all ships that pass, name, height, width, weight, where they are going, etc. and there are many who pass here on their way to either the Kiel Canal or into Hamburg.

Even though it’s still chilly, it’s sunny, and we bring out the bikes. The city will be a pleasant surprise, full of cozy streets, nice houses and a protective wall stretches as protection around the whole city.

A nice city center and as usual with a ”bakery” on every street corner, and long sandy beaches. Despite only 13 degrees in the water, there were some who bathed. Children of course, but even an older couple of about 80 years lay in and swam, for a long time. Due to strong currents, there was a fenced area of about 50×50 m, probably